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In Darkness

The Babadook, Dark Touch, Nick Cave

The 58th BFI London Film Festival runs from 8 to 19 October, and we have reviews of Peter Strickland’s latest, The Duke of Burgundy, enigmatic Hong Kong serial killer drama Black Coal, Thin Ice, Spanish cave chiller In Darkness We Fall, science-fiction-tinged horror tale Spring, Tetsuya Nakashima’s new film The World of Kanako and Chinese Spaghetti Western homage No Man’s Land. We also interview Viggo Mortensen about his involvement in Lisandro Alonso's Jauja, and to mark the 40th anniversary screening of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, we explore how Tobe Hooper’s landmark film was created from the original script.

LFF audiences will also have a chance to check out the brilliant Iranian skateboarding vampire girl tale A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night and Aleksei German’s sumptuous final sci-fi epic Hard to Be a God, both first seen at the 20th Etrange Festival. Straight from Toronto come Mark Hartley's Electric Boogaloo and Abel Ferrara’s Pasolini while post-Spanish Civil War horrific sisterly drama Shrew’s Nest, produced by Alex de la Iglesia, was a highlight at Sitges.

On general release in UK cinemas this month is the creepy and poignant Australian monster tale The Babadook, and we have an interview with director Jennifer Kent. Plus, we review Nacho Vigalondo’s found footage thriller Open Windows, hallucinatory French nightmare Horsehead and Ramin Bahrani’s superb 99 Homes, a TIFF favourite.

In home entertainment, we take a look at David Cronenberg's newly restored Shivers, Marina de Van’s Irish-set supernatural drama Dark Touch, and we have a comic strip review of Hayao Miyazaki’s final film The Wind Rises. We also speak with Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard about their Nick Cave film 20,000 Days on Earth, while in the Film Jukebox, Athens-based dance music duo Felizol and the Boy pick their favourite movies.

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The End: An Electric Sheep Anthology

The End: An Electric Sheep Anthology (Strange Attractor Press) brings together Bill Morrison's chemical ghosts, 50s bad girls, apocalyptic evangelical cinema, Spanish zombies, Japanese nihilists and David Lynch's soundtracks of decay. 'Superb - a masterly accomplishment. Beautifully produced - and its content and vision could not be more accurate and timely.' - Peter Whitehead. Read the reviews.

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Stanislaw Lem

To mark the theatrical release of Ari Folman’s brilliant The Congress, we celebrate one of the most inventive and ingenious science fiction writers of all times, whose work has much influenced cinema. We take a look at Tarkovsky's Solaris, listen to the future sounds of Zdenĕk Liška's score for Ikarie XB-1 and discuss Polish and Russian Sci-Fi Cinema in a podcast. Plus we are pleased to make available an extract of Lem’s delightfully surreal The Futurological Congress.

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The Fright Theorem: Ted Kotcheff and Terry Gilliam

Alex Fitch talks to Ted Kotcheff, the director of ‘lost’ cult classic Wake in Fright (1971), and to Terry Gilliam, whose long-awaited new film The Zero Theorem (2013) has had a long road to the screen.

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UK Premiere: Future Shock! The Story of 2000AD + Q&A

On 28 October 2014, the BFI is hosting the special UK premiere of Paul Goodwin's fantastic documentary Future Shock! The Story of 2000AD – a film for those who are already fans of the legendary British sci-fi comic, and those who don’t know they are yet. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with the director, producers Helen Mullane and Sean Hogan, the creator of 2000AD, Pat Mills, and artist Kevin O'Neill. For more information and to book tickets, please visit the BFI website.

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